CanSat-Challenge

CanSat-Challenge

With the CanSat Challenge, we want to provide a fast and easy opportunity for new students to get introduced to space projects. They will be provided with a task and have the build volume of one 0.33l can to fullfill the challenge.

ROACH 2 EN

ROACH 2 EN

ROACH2 (Robotic in-Orbit Analysis of Cover Hulls) will be our third experiment within the DLR REXUS/BEXUS programme. The KSat/ROACH2 team has submitted an application for the REXUS 27/28 cycle.

BUBBLE

BUBBLE

BUBBLE (BUoyancy Balloon Bus Lifted Experiments) is our high altitude balloon program.
We provide the bus system for the gondola to fly various payloads from KSat and external payloads. The launch and recovery is organized by us.

SOURCE

SOURCE

SOURCE (Stuttgart Operated University Research Cubesat for Evaluation and Education) is a 3U CubeSat, to be launched in two years. Project phase A was completed in July of this year, we are now busy working on phase B of the project towards a Preliminary Design Review in January 2019.

PAPELL

PAPELL

Pump Application using Pulsed Electromagnets for Liquid reLocation(PAPELL) is an experiment to prove the basic functionality of pumps using ferrofluids in microgravitation. Ferrofluids are liquids that develop magnetic properties in magnetic fields and can thus be manipulated with magnets. The pump does not use moving mechanical parts, relying on the interaction between the ferrofluid and electromagnets. Careful activation and deactivation of the electromagnets can move ferrofluid drops through the experiment area. The experiment can show the possible future application of ferrofluid based pumps for future space projects.

ROACH

ROACH

ROACH (Robotic in-Orbit Analysis of Cover Hulls) researches the use of electrostatic adhesion for new locomotion methods in space. ROACH launched within the REXUS/BEXUS program aboard REXUS 24 in March 2018. ROACH2 will be launched aboard REXUS 28 in March 2020.

The project is inspired by the increasing threat to spacecraft posed by space debris and micro-meteorites. Hulls of spacecraft are additionally subject to fatigue, e. g. due to radiation. Both sources of damage can potentially destroy or impair the spacecraft. Based on this experiment, robots may enable autonomous maintenance by searching for damage and performing small repairs. The locomotion of such a rover on a spacecraft’s hull and its adhesion to the spacecraft is the primary challenge. The principle of electrostatic adhesion shall be used to achieve that.